Four $25,000, one-year fellowships for early-career women in science.

Announcing the 2015 L’Oréal Australia & New Zealand For Women in Science Fellows:

Dr Jodie Rummer| Dr Muireann Irish | Dr Shari Breen|
Dr Christina Riesselman

2015 - Dr Jodie Rummer

A hot future for sharks

2015 - Dr Muireann Irish

How we imagine the future

2015 - Dr Shari Breen

The short lives of hard-living, fast burning, high mass stars

2015 NZ Fellow - Dr Christina Riesselman

When the oceans were 20 metres higher: revealing past and future climates

2014 - Dr Elena Tucker

Solving genetic disease mysteries

2014 - Dr Vanessa Kellermann

How flies can help us predict the future

2014 - Dr Cara Doherty

Clean water with crystals

2013 - Dr Misty Jenkins

When killing saves lives: our immune system at work

2013 - Dr Kathryn Holt

Tracking the spread of deadly diseases

2013 - Dr Joanne Whittaker

How Australia and India broke up -100 million years ago

2012 - Dr Suetonia Palmer

Giving patients more control of their lives

2012 - Dr Kylie Mason

New treatments for blood cancers

2012 - Dr Baohua Jia

More efficient solar cells with quantum dots

2011 - Tracy Ainsworth

The complex life of coral

2011 - Georgina Such

A smarter way to deliver drugs

2011 - Eve McDonald-Madden

Can we save the tiger with mathematics?

2010 - Rowena Martin

Fighting back against malaria

2010 - Marie-Liesse Asselin-Labat

How does breast cancer start?

2010 - Deanna D’Alessandro

Mopping up gases

2009 - Zenobia Jacobs

How did we get here?

2009 - Tamara Davis

On the hunt for dark energy

2009 - Marnie Blewitt

Reading the Genome

2008 - Natalie Borg

Crystallising a career in immunology

2008 - Erika Cretney

Unravelling the complexity of the immune system

2008 - Angela Moles

Big ecology: from tundra to rainforest, desert to savanna

2008 - Amanda Barnard

Are nanoparticles safe?

2007 - Sarah Pryke

Life and love amongst the finches

2007 - Jenny Gunton

Could Vitamin D have a role in diabetes?

2007 - Ilana Feain

School girls join study to understand black holes and the birth of stars

2007 - Catriona Bradshaw

New ways of looking at old diseases

Fish faster than Usain Bolt

8 October 2015
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2015 L’Oréal for Women in Science Fellow Jodie Rummer loves fish, and she reckons they are pretty good athletes to. It’s a view that’s backed up by her research on their ability to deliver oxygen around their bodies – published in PLOS One this week.   Are fish the greatest athletes on the planet? When […]

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Photos of the 2015 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Australia & New Zealand Fellows

9 September 2015

Images from the 2015 Fellowship Ceremony below Hi-res photos of the Fellows are available in their profiles, and videos available here for download in high definition, with and without audio A hot future for sharks: marine biologist Jodie Rummer, Townsville How we imagine the future: cognitive neuroscientist Muireann Irish, Sydney The short lives of hard-living, fast burning, […]

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Sticky: L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Australia & New Zealand Fellows

8 September 2015

Links to full profiles below Hi-res photos of the Fellows are available in their profiles Videos embedded in profiles and available here for download in high definition, with and without audio The winners of the 2015 L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Australia & New Zealand Fellowships are studying sharks, future memories, heavy stars, and climate […]

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NZ: Pioneering research earns inaugural science award

8 September 2015

University of Otago geologist to research climate change since the last Ice Age 2014 may have been the hottest year on record, but was it the hottest year since the end of the last Ice Age? And if it wasn’t, what could that mean for us and our grandchildren? These are some of the questions […]

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When the oceans were 20 metres higher: revealing past and future climates

8 September 2015
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Dr Christina Riesselman, geologist, University of Otago, Dunedin Three million years ago Earth was much as it is today – familiar continents, animals, and carbon dioxide levels. But temperatures were higher and sea levels were also about 20 metres higher. Today, a billion people live on land less than 20 metres above sea level, and […]

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The short lives of hard-living, fast burning, high mass stars

8 September 2015
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Dr Shari Breen, astronomer, CSIRO, Sydney We are made of star stuff. The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth and the iron in our blood were all made in high mass stars that burnt briefly and brightly before exploding. Dr Shari Breen is using ‘The Dish’ at Parkes and a network of […]

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How we imagine the future

8 September 2015
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Dr Muireann Irish, cognitive neuroscientist, Neuroscience Research Australia/UNSW, Sydney Dr Muireann Irish has discovered which parts of our brain are essential to imagine the future, ranging from simple things like “I must remember my keys and my wallet when I go out,” to imagining complex events such as “my next holiday”. And she has shown […]

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A hot future for sharks

8 September 2015
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Dr Jodie Rummer, marine biologist, James Cook University, Townsville Dr Jodie Rummer swims with sharks for her research. She is fascinated by fish and their ability to deliver oxygen to their muscles 20 to 50 times more efficiently than we can. Her global research into salmon, mackerel, hagfish, and now sharks explains why fish dominate […]

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Celebrating our 2015 Fellows in Sydney this September

23 July 2015
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Posted on behalf of Samantha Hass (Head of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, L’Oréal Australia & New Zealand) Every year we’re impressed by both the quality and quantity of the women in science who apply for the L’Oréal For Women in Science Fellowships — and this year was no exception, with 240 applications from Australia and New Zealand. […]

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Kat Holt maps superbug’s genome

23 June 2015

2013 L’Oréal Australia Fellow, and 2015 International Rising Star award winner Kat Holt recently helped map the genome of a superbug that had been turning up in hospitals in Victoria, and around the globe. Kat Holt and the team sequenced the genomes of over 300 strains of the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria to find out which genetic […]

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